You and Your Horse

Finding your own way with horses

Our Blog

All about the time we spend with our horses.

Here you can find various articles and inspiration on living and working with horses:

Basics about anatomy and biomechanics – Part 5: The various neck postures

Posted by on Aug 11, 2016 in All, Lungeing | 0 comments

Basics about anatomy and biomechanics – Part 5: The various neck postures

In the previous part I talked about the neck musculature of the horse. In that blog entry I also mentioned how important it is to learn to see which neck posture is good or bad for the horse, and this I will discuss now in more detail. (more…)

Basics about anatomy and biomechanics – Part 4: 
The equine neck

Posted by on Jun 1, 2016 in All, Health, Lungeing | 0 comments

Basics about anatomy and biomechanics – Part 4: 
The equine neck

We will now have a look at the front part of the horse by starting at looking at the musculature of the neck. (more…)

Basics about anatomy and biomechanics – Part 3: 
Bending the haunches

Posted by on May 13, 2016 in All, Health, Lungeing | 0 comments

Basics about anatomy and biomechanics – Part 3: 
Bending the haunches

When talking about the bend of the haunches we are talking about the flexion of the large joints of the hindquarters:

  • Hip joint
  • Stifle joint
  • Tarsal (hock) joint

The more the horse flexes these joints, the more collected he will be. (more…)

What is violence?

Posted by on Feb 17, 2016 in All, Commitment to Protecting Horses, Handling | 0 comments

What is violence?

Do we really have to define violence? Shouldn’t it be clear what violence is and what it isn’t?

(more…)

Article about our lungeing course

Posted by on Jan 14, 2016 in All, Lungeing | 0 comments

Article about our lungeing course

Here you can read an interesting report by Yvonne Eberling which appeared in the Icelandic Horse Quarterly 3/09. It shows the positive effects of correct lungeing with our course in lungeing.

(more…)

Basics about anatomy and biomechanics – Part 2: 
The importance of the hindquarters

Posted by on Aug 27, 2015 in All, Lungeing | 0 comments

Basics about anatomy and biomechanics – Part 2: 
The importance of the hindquarters

In the first part of this series we had a look at the back of the horse. We learned that a raised back very much depends on the engagement of the hindquarters.

(more…)

Babette’s Cavesson

Posted by on Jul 17, 2015 in All, Lungeing | 0 comments

Babette’s Cavesson

I recommend using a cavesson for doing the work as set out in our Lungeing Course.  But up to now I was not 100% happy with any cavesson you could buy.

So now there is a cavesson that you can buy that I have developed myself. (more…)

Basics about anatomy and biomechanics – Part 1: The horse’s back

Posted by on May 8, 2015 in All, Handling, Lungeing | 0 comments

Basics about anatomy and biomechanics – Part 1: The horse’s back

It’s a fact that a horse isn’t a pack animal. If we want him to carry a rider without suffering physical damage in the long run, we have to teach him a different way of moving and to build up the necessary muscles. In order to understand how the horse has to move, we have to take a closer look at the horse’s back.

(more…)

The horse suffering from load bearing burnout

Posted by on Apr 8, 2015 in All, Health, Lungeing | 0 comments

The horse suffering from load bearing burnout

Do you know the term “load bearing burnout?” I have to admit that I didn’t before reading Tanja Richter’s book “The Illusions of Horse Osteopathy”  (available only in German), even though unfortunately I see an awful lot of horses that are in this state.  So that you know what to expect from load bearing burnout and can recognise it in the future when you encounter a horse in this state, I would like to introduce you to it today. (more…)

“Pferdgerecht”: What is a fair and appropriate association with the horse?

Posted by on Apr 1, 2015 in All, Commitment to Protecting Horses, Handling, Keeping | 0 comments

“Pferdgerecht”: What is a fair and appropriate association with the horse?

Where I live and work in Germany there is a term which you come across sooner or later whenever you read or talk about horses:  “Pferdgerecht.”   This is a term which is as untranslatable as other German words such as schadenfreude or angst which have been adopted as English.  Although one might say that “pferdgerecht” is a word the English language would be enriched by adopting this has not happened as yet. So I offer “fair and appropriate for the horse” as a rather long-winded but accurate translation of the term. It is a concept which is constantly there when we read and talk about horses and it is naturally a theme which really gets us going and touches a nerve because, after all,  who doesn’t want to treat their horse both fairly and appropriately? (more…)